Welcome

Welcome to the Social Studies Department at NRHS

Teacher List and Emails

 

Teacher Name (Last Name, First Name)

Teacher Email

Beck, Jon

jbeck@nredlearn.org

Billig, Marty

mbillig@nredlearn.org

Browne, Dan

dbrowne@nredlearn.org

Byrne, Tim

timbyrne@nredlearn.org

Chipman, Jillian

jchipman@nredlearn.org

Collins-Thomas, Laurie

lcollins@nredlearn.org

Corcoran, Kevin kcorcoran@nredlearn.org

Dower, Richard

rdower@nredlearn.org

Figueroa, Cristian

cfigueroa@nredlearn.org

Foster, Michael

mfoster@nredlearn.org

Fraioli, John

jfraioli@nredlearn.org

Gurney, Darren

dgurney@nredlearn.org

Jackson, Lauren

ljackson@nredlearn.org

Katz, Eric

ekatz@nredlearn.org

Keolamphu, Joseph

jkeolamphu@nredlearn.org

Kuklis, Tim

tkuklis@nredlearn.org

McCutchen, Alprentice

amccutchen@nredlearn.org

McIvor, Kevin

kmcivor@nredlearn.org

McNamara, Dan

dmcnamara@nredlearn.org

Minchin, Debbie

dminchin@nredlearn.org

Naclerio, Paul

pnaclerio@nredlearn.org

Orlando, Tim

torlando@nredlearn.org

Raboy, Brett

braboy@nredlearn.org

Rose, Karen

krose@nredlearn.org

Saglibene, Kristin

ksaglibene@nredlearn.org

Thompson, Carine

cthompson@nredlearn.org

Wood, Eric

ewood@nredlearn.org

ONLINE RESOURCES

 AP Social Studies Selection Process 2019-20

 

 2019 Social Studies Senior Selection Power Point Presentation 

 

ONLINE RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS, WHO NEED TO PASS THE TRANSITIONAL GLOBAL HISTORY EXAM:

U.S. HISTORY AND GOVERNMENT STUDY RESOURCES

http://www.mrklaff.com/usregentsreview.html

This site features interactive eFlashcards, review definitions and cause and effect of historical events for US History.

http://www.phschool.com/curriculum_support/brief_review/us_history/

Multiple choice questions and DBQs are broken up into 6 major sections for US History review convenience.

http://www.bcsd.org/webpages/atrama/regents.cfm?subpage=71103

Review and prepare for the exam in 10 days! This site breaks down the content in large sections for students to more easily focus on areas of importance.

http://www.brainpop.com/socialstudies/ushistory/

Fun, interactive online games to review roles of government and categorize terms and concepts in US History.

http://www.historyteacher.net/AmericanHistoryAndGovernment/ReviewMaterials/us_history_regents_review_sheet.htm

Multiple choice questions that focus on challenging cross-topical areas and crucial Supreme Court cases of US History.

https://quizlet.com/18520455/us-history-regents-review-flash-cards/

Features flashcards , interactive games, and vocabulary review.

 

 

Offered Courses

GLOBAL HISTORY I - REGENTS
Departmental Final Exam
Offered in Grade 9
Prerequisite: Social Studies 8
Starting with a study of world geography, this chronological survey course in world history progresses from early river valley civilizations through the mid-eighteenth century. Students will examine the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space. This will include the study of the major political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments and the important roles of individuals and groups. Map skills, essay writing and research skills (including analysis of primary source documents) and cooperative learning activities will be emphasized.

GLOBAL HISTORY I - SHELTERED
Departmental Final Exam
Offered in Grade 9
This course is designed for the English as a Second Language student. Starting with a study of world geography, this chronological survey course in world history progresses from early river valley civilizations through the mid-eighteenth century. Students will examine the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space. This will include the study of the major political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments and the important roles of individuals and groups. Reading and writing in the content area as well as research (including the analysis of primary source documents) and map skills will be emphasized. Upon completion, students may be mainstreamed into the regular Social Studies sequence. All students taking Global History I ESL must take an appropriate level English as a Second Language course.

GLOBAL HISTORY II - REGENTS
Regents Exam Required
Offered in Grade 10
Prerequisite: Global History I
This is a chronological survey course in world history from the mid-eighteenth century to the present-day. Students will examine the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space. Special attention will be devoted to the development of political, economic and social institutions, international relations, and cultural traditions. The second half of the course will focus on the contemporary world. Map skills, essay writing and research skills (including the analysis of primary source documents) and cooperative learning activities will be emphasized. Students will be required to complete a major research project.

GLOBAL HISTORY II - SHELTERED
Regents Exam Required
Offered in Grade 10
Prerequisite: Global History I Sheltered
This course, designed for the English as a Second Language student, who has completed Global History I Sheltered, or an equivalent course. This is a chronological survey course in world history from the mid-eighteenth century to the present day. Students will examine the human condition and the connections and interactions of people across time and space. Special attention will be devoted to the development of political, economic and social institutions, international relations, and cultural traditions. The second half of the course will focus on the contemporary world. Map skills, essay writing and research skills (including the analysis of primary source documents) and cooperative learning activities will be emphasized. All students will take the Regents examination. Upon completion, students may be mainstreamed into the regular Social Studies sequence.

AP WORLD HISTORY
Regents Exam and AP Exam Required
Offered in Grade 10
Pre-requisite: Global History I, Pre-AP Assignment, and Departmental Approval
This is a challenging, college-level history course that seeks to help students understand the larger patterns of human history. It is aligned with the expectations and College Board program course description for the AP World History course. It builds on an understanding of cultural, institutional, and technological precedents that, along with geography, set the human stage prior to 1750 as studied in Global History and Geography I. The course focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about world history and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — focusing on the environment, cultures, state-building, economic systems, and social structures — provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. AP World History encompasses the history of the five major geographical regions of the globe: Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Oceania, with special focus on historical developments and processes that cross multiple regions.
Because the students have been especially selected for their ability and interest in history, it is assumed that they have the capability to do more advanced work. Significant primary and secondary source readings combined with research and analytical essay writing skills will be emphasized. Students will be required to complete a major research paper.  Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam, which is required of all students. The rigor of this course prepares students for future advanced placement courses and reflects the high expectations necessary to meet the mastery level for the Global History and Geography Regents exam that will be given in June.

AMERICAN HISTORY & GOVERNMENT - REGENTS
Regents Exam Required
Offered in Grade 11
Prerequisite: Global History II
This is a chronologically developed course in American History with special focus on the development of the political system and the United States as an industrial nation. This includes an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context and the ways people are unified by many values, practices and traditions. Constitutional and legal issues will be explored in depth as well as issues of foreign policy and international involvement. Oral presentations, research skills (including the analysis of primary source documents) and thesis writing will be emphasized. Students will be required to complete a major research paper.

AP AMERICAN HISTORY & GOVERNMENT
Regents Exam and AP Exam Required
Offered in Grade 11
Prerequisite: Global History II & Departmental Approval
AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. history course. In AP U.S. History students investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present. Students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians: analyzing primary and secondary sources; developing historical arguments; making historical comparisons; and utilizing reasoning about contextualization, causation, and continuity and change over time. The course also provides seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places: American and national identity; migration and settlement; politics and power; work, exchange, and technology; America in the world; geography and the environment; and culture and society.  Because the students have been especially selected for their ability and interest in history, it is assumed that they have the capability to do more advanced work. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students.

AMERICAN HISTORY & GOVERNMENT - SHELTERED
Regents Exam Required
Offered in Grade 11
Prerequisite: American Society Sheltered or Global History 2 Sheltered
This course, designed for the English as a Second Language student who has completed the introductory course in American Society, is a chronologically developed course in American History with emphasis on the development of the political system and the United States as an industrial nation. This includes an analysis of the development of American culture, its diversity and multicultural context and the ways people are unified by many values, practices and traditions. Constitutional and legal issues will be explored in depth as well as issues of foreign policy and international involvement. Oral presentations, research skills (including the analysis of primary source documents) and thesis writing will be emphasized. Assignments are designed to help students strengthen their English skills as they learn the course content.

 

JUNIOR & SENIOR COURSES
ECONOMICS Requirement
Students may satisfy the state-mandated economics requirement by enrolling in and passing one of the following courses:

ECONOMICS
A one-semester course intended to acquaint students with the role of economics in American society. Economics is the study of how society manages its scarce resources. In most societies, resources are allocated not by a single central planner but through the combined actions of millions of households and firms. Economists therefore study how people make decisions: how much they work, what they buy, how much they save and how they invest their savings. This course will focus around decision making including how to make good decisions (both monetary and nonmonetary), an introduction to major decisions people make in our economy such as buying a car or choosing a career, and how institutions such as financial firms or government departments make decisions. This course aims to dispel economics’ reputation as the “dismal science” and rebrand it into the “practical science.” Students will be involved in simulations and play a stock market game.

ESSENTIAL ECONOMICS
Basic economic principles (such as scarcity, supply and demand, productivity, opportunity cost) and their application to everyday situations in American life are emphasized in this one-semester course. Elements of the economy such as taxation, investments, etc. and the United States and the world economy are important topics covered. Students will use the computer to learn about the operation of the stock market.

GLOBAL ECONOMICS
Offered in Grade 11 & 12
The study of economics requires an understanding of major economic concepts and systems, the principles of economic decision making, and the interdependence of economies throughout the world. This one-semester course will examine how economics and economic systems, have influenced major themes, concepts, and events in Global History. Topics will include the movement of people and goods, individual responsibility and the economy, globalization, increased economic interdependence, and social and political challenges created by various economic systems. (Eg: unemployment, inflation, poverty, and environmental consequences). Additionally, economic principles (such as scarcity, supply and demand, productivity, opportunity cost) and their application to everyday situations in American life will be studied. Students will receive instruction and practice in the analysis of primary and secondary source documents, essay writing, graph/chart/political cartoon and map interpretation. This course is designed to enhance student’s understanding of Global Studies, through the study of Economics.

ENTREPRENEURSHIP
This introductory course is designed to acquaint the student and/or the potential small business owner with the problems and opportunities of starting and operating a small business. Subjects covered include: the characteristics of the successful entrepreneur, basic steps in starting a business, the advantages and disadvantages of small business ownership, legal forms of ownership, small business record keeping, the financing of a new business, how to advertise, buying into an existing business or franchise, and the reasons why small businesses fail.  Upon approval, Westchester Community College will grant transferable credits for successful completion of this course. A modest tuition fee is charged by W.C.C. Successful completion of this course will satisfy the state-mandated economics requirement.

TOPICS IN ECONOMICS AND PERSONAL FINANCE
Offered in Grade 11 & 12
Students will analyze the effectiveness of varying ways individuals, societies, nations, and regions of the world attempt to satisfy their basic needs and wants by utilizing scarce resources.
Economic concepts such as efficient allocation of limited resources, supply/demand relationship, opportunity cost of each decision made, production, money, economic growth, markets, costs, ethics, and competition will be defined and applied to personal finance scenarios. Students will set personal financial goals, recognize needs and debt obligations, and learn how to utilize effective budgeting, borrowing, and investment strategies to maximize well-being. Students will examine various risk factors when setting financial goals and budgeting for anticipated savings and spending. This course will review the forms and purposes of financial credit, the effects of personal debt, and the role and impact of interest.

AP MACROECONOMICS (With Government)
AP Exam Required
Prerequisite: American History, 85% or better on the US History & Government Regents and Departmental approval
AP Macroeconomics is an introductory college-level course that focuses on the principles that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination; it also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. Students learn to use graphs, charts, and data to analyze, describe, and explain economic concepts. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam, which is required of all students.
Successful completion of this course will satisfy the state-mandated participation in government requirement.

AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY (With Economics)
AP EXAM REQUIRED
Offered in Grades 11 , 12
Pre-Requisite: Global History & Geography, 85% or higher on the Global History Regents and Departmental Approval.
This college-level course is designed to give students a critical perspective of human social organization and its environmental consequences. Students will learn about the methods and tools used by geographers in their science and practice. Emphasis will be placed on geographic models and their applications. Case studies from around the glove globe are compared to those in the United States. The course is organized around seven major topics: Geography: Its Nature and Perspectives; Population and Migration; Cultural Patterns and Processes; Political Organization of Space; Agriculture, Food Production, and Rural Land Use; Industrialization and Economic Development; Cities and Urban Land Use. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students. Successful completion of this course will satisfy the state-mandated Economics requirement.

Law and Government Requirement
Students may satisfy the state-mandated Law and Government requirement by enrolling in and passing one of the following courses:

LAW & GOVERNMENT
This one-semester is designed for the student who has an interest in the American legal system and contemporary politics. After a review of the Constitution and the organization of the American political system, the course will focus on several of the following topics: civil, criminal and constitutional law; political beliefs and behaviors; political parties and interest groups; basic civil rights and the significant Supreme Court decisions; and the role of the media. Students will study various economic, social, environmental and political trends and the issues they raise for future voters and citizens. Topics of both domestic and foreign policy will be discussed. Among the activities will be mock trials, guest speakers, simulations, debates and research.

POLITICAL ISSUES THROUGH FILM
Media has been and continues to be a major influence on our lives. Since its inception, the medium of film has had mass appeal that frequently filters our perceptions of the world, its people, history, and government. This course will synthesize both civics, citizenship and government content and social studies skills as it develops students into active learners and critical thinkers of the “film’s story.” The films that will be studied will deal with those issues vital importance to citizenship. Students will have the opportunity to define societal issues, gather and research current and historical primary sources and other materials, and practice the principles of critical analysis and evaluation through film studies. They will also enhance their effective oral and written skills.

FACING HISTORY & OURSELVES
Offered in Grades 11 , 12
This course offers a dynamic framework for examining civics and human behavior. Using the methods of inquiry, analysis, and interpretation, Facing History promotes the knowledge, values, and skills needed to preserve and protect a democracy. It begins with issues of identity, moves to a consideration of history and judgment, and ends with examples of positive participation. Throughout, students confront the moral questions inherent in a study not only of prejudice, racism, anti-Semitism, but also of courage, caring, and compassion. By studying the historical development and lessons of the Civil Rights Movement and the Holocaust and other violations of human rights, students will come to understand that few events in history are inevitable; most are the result of choices made by countless individuals and groups. Ultimately, students make the essential connection between history and the moral choices they confront in their own lives.

AP AMERICAN GOVERNMENT & POLITICS (With Economics)
AP EXAM REQUIRED
Prerequisite: American History, 85% or better on the U.S. Hist.& Gov.Regents & Departmental Approval
This full year course combines the one-semester course in Economics (3810) with a one-semester course in Advanced Placement American Government & Politics. This college-level course is designed to give students a critical perspective on government and politics in the United States. It involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies and current events.  It will require familiarity with the various institutions, beliefs and ideas which make up the American political reality. The following topics are central to the course organization: constitutional underpinnings of American government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties and interest groups, institutions and policy processes of national government, civil rights and civil liberties. Critical analysis, significant research and thesis writing are emphasized. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students.

AMERICAN SOCIETY - SHELTERED
This course, designed for the beginning English as a Second Language student, is an overview of basic geographic skills and an introduction to the other disciplines that comprise social studies: history, economics and political science. Especially important is the introduction to American culture and an overview of United States geography, government, citizenship, and practical economics, to understand the development of the American political system.
In addition, significant emphasis will be placed on reading and writing skills in the content area.  (Students will satisfy the NYS mandates in Economics and Government.)

 

ELECTIVE OFFERINGS:

AP EUROPEAN HISTORY
AP EXAM REQUIRED
Prerequisite: American History & Departmental Approval
The Advanced Placement course in European History focuses on developing students’ abilities to think conceptually about European history from approximately 1450 to the present and apply historical thinking skills as they learn about the past. Five themes of equal importance — Interaction of Europe and the World, Poverty and Prosperity, Objective Knowledge and Subjective Visions, States and Other Institutions of Power, and Individual and Society— provide areas of historical inquiry for investigation throughout the course. These require students to reason historically about continuity and change over time and make comparisons among various historical developments in different times and places. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students.

PSYCHOLOGY
Offered in Grades 11, 12
The basic goal of this one-semester introductory course is to familiarize students with concepts and principles of psychology so that they will be able to understand the psychological processes which have shaped their behavior. Personality, gender, theories of learning, altered states of consciousness, and human development are among the topics that will be studied and discussed.

AP PSYCHOLOGY 1.00
Offered in Grades 11, 12
AP EXAM REQUIRED
Prerequisite: American History
This college-level course introduces students to the systematic and scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. While considering the psychologists and studies that have shaped the field, students explore and apply psychological theories, key concepts, and phenomena associated with such topics as the biological bases of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and cognition, motivation, developmental psychology, testing and individual differences, treatment of abnormal behavior, and social psychology. Throughout the course, students will employ psychological research methods, including ethical considerations, as they use the scientific method, analyze bias, and evaluate claims and evidence. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students.

PHILOSOPHY
Offered in Grades 11, 12
Philosophical themes such as: Does free will exist? Is knowledge possible? Does God exist? Why does evil exist? Who are we? What is real? What is right? These questions will be discussed and analyzed along with their connection in both the Western and the Eastern worlds. The philosophies of Socrates, Plato, Lao-Tse, Buddha and Locke will be among those discussed. This one-semester introductory course will emphasize the development of position papers on topics of student interest, which will then be presented to the class. In addition, the students will keep a weekly reflection journal.

AP ART HISTORY
Offered in Grades 11 , 12
AP EXAM REQUIRED
Prerequisite: Global History I and II
AP Art History is a chronological survey of artistic styles, artists, architecture, painting, and sculpture primarily of the western tradition with periodic introductions of non-western work from Africa, the Americas, Asia, the Near East, Oceanic and Islamic traditions Since art is the reflection of the time, place, and people which produced it, the course is as much concerned with history as with art. In order to understand the similarities and differences that exist in our visual world, we will explore the symbolism, artistic processes and political, social, economic and scientific background of the artwork. Central to the course is the development of visual literacy, oral and written skills of comparative analysis, and the understanding of those works in historical and sociological context. This course requires a high degree of commitment and academic work as students should be engaged at the same level as a college level art history survey. Students who have done well in the history courses or studio arts are especially encouraged to enroll. Students may be granted college credit or placement for this course based upon their performance in the nationally administered exam which is required of all students.

SOCIOLOGY
Offered in Grades 11, 12
This one-semester course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to analyze societies, cultures, and the relationship between the individual and society. The primary units of study are methods and techniques of sociological research; culture and its effect on the individual; social institutions such as school, religion, and family, and race, gender and economic inequality around the world. American society is used as the basis of study with comparisons made with other cultures when appropriate.

COLLEGE SOCIOLOGY
Offered in Grades 11, 12
This college-level course is an analytic, skills-based introduction to sociology. The emphasis is on analytic reading and conceptual analysis. The approach to sociology is to view it as an empirical social science. As the course progresses, students should obtain increasing skill in analytic reading and writing, sociological reasoning, empirical investigation, and in the ability to make empirical and conceptual generalizations about self and society in an increasingly global world.. Topics include: Sociological Perspectives; Doing Social Research; Culture, Groups, and Social Structure; The Power and Influence of the Media; Self and Identity; Social Inequality (Race, Class and Gender); Thinking about Society. For a nominal fee, students may receive three college credits through Syracuse University

ADVANCED TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES
Offered in Grades 11, 12
This course is a study of Latin American history and geography to the present. The course of study primarily focuses on 20th century political, economic, social and cultural history of Latin America. Key issues covered include the relationship of Latin American nations among themselves and with the rest of the world. Course examines historical roots of region tensions, national economies, political instability, reform movements and revolutions. The course focuses on evolving role of women, religious upheavals, cultural/artistic movements and problems of sovereignty.
This course will also cover civics, citizenship and government content and social studies skills. Emphasis will be given to the relationship of the United with various nations in Latin America, and the historical context of United States foreign policy as it relates to Latin America.
Westchester Community College will grant transferable credits for successful completion of this course. A modest tuition fee is charged by W.C.C.
(Successful completion of this course will satisfy the NYS mandates in Economics and Government.)

TOPICS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES
Offered in Grades 12
Pre-requisite: American History & Government or AP United States History
This honors-level survey course covers the African American experience. It begins with the settlement of Virginia and the arrival of the first African people to the British North America. The course includes a study of the African continent to the 17th century focusing on the movement of African people through the Atlantic Slave Trade. In North America the focus is on the role of African Americans in shaping the national experience. Topics include slavery and resistance to slavery, building of African American communities through the 19th century, impact and outcome of Civil War protest and African American experience prior to and following the Civil Rights Movement.
Additionally, this course will examine how economics and economic systems, have influenced major themes, concepts, and events in U.S. History, as it relates to African-Americans. Economic principles such as scarcity, supply and demand, productivity, opportunity cost, and their application to everyday situations in American life will be studied. (Successful completion of this course will satisfy the NYS mandates in Economics and Government.)

20th CENTURY MUSICAL THEATER IN AMERICA
Offered in Grades 10, 11, 12
Prerequisite: Completion of PAVE 1
This course is designed to provide an overview of the history of musical theater in the United States while simultaneously developing the individual’s creative performance and technical abilities. We will examine the lives and contributions of the major composers, book writers, lyricists, directors, and choreographers in American musical theater, as well as the musical productions that received their creative energy. We will also look at the manner in which American musical theater evolved, and how this evolution related to the cultural and societal changes of the period. In addition, students will work to develop their theatrical, vocal, lyric composition, and dance skills. Students must enroll in this course to complete their sequence requirement in PAVE: Acting.

GERMANY EXCHANGE SEMINAR
Offered in Grades 11, 12
Students who participate in the exchange program with a high school in Hamburg, Germany are required to enroll in this seminar where they will be introduced to German language, culture and society. A joint project with students from the German Gymnasium is mandatory.